The effect of task order on the maintainability of object-oriented software (bibtex)
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Abstract:
This paper presents results from a quasi-experiment that investigates$\backslash$nhow the sequence in which maintenance tasks are performed affects$\backslash$nthe time required to perform them and the functional correctness$\backslash$nof the changes made. Specifically, the study compares how time required$\backslash$nand correctness are affected by (1) starting with the easiest change$\backslash$ntask and progressively performing the more difficult tasks (Easy-First),$\backslash$nversus (2) starting with the most difficult change task and progressively$\backslash$nperforming the easier tasks (Hard-First). In both cases, the experimental$\backslash$ntasks were performed on two alternative types of design of a Java$\backslash$nsystem to assess whether the choice of the design strategy moderates$\backslash$nthe effects of task order on effort and correctness. The results$\backslash$nshow that the time spent on making the changes is not affected significantly$\backslash$nby the task order of the maintenance tasks, regardless of the type$\backslash$nof design. However, the correctness of the maintainability tasks$\backslash$nis significantly higher when the task order of the change tasks is$\backslash$nEasy-First compared to Hard-First, again regardless of design. A$\backslash$npossible explanation for the results is that a steeper learning curve$\backslash$n(Hard-First) causes the programmer to create software that is less$\backslash$nmaintainable overall. \textcopyright 2008 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
Reference:
The effect of task order on the maintainability of object-oriented software (), In Information and Software Technology, volume 51, 2009.
Bibtex Entry:
@article{Wang2009293,
abstract = {This paper presents results from a quasi-experiment that investigates$\backslash$nhow the sequence in which maintenance tasks are performed affects$\backslash$nthe time required to perform them and the functional correctness$\backslash$nof the changes made. Specifically, the study compares how time required$\backslash$nand correctness are affected by (1) starting with the easiest change$\backslash$ntask and progressively performing the more difficult tasks (Easy-First),$\backslash$nversus (2) starting with the most difficult change task and progressively$\backslash$nperforming the easier tasks (Hard-First). In both cases, the experimental$\backslash$ntasks were performed on two alternative types of design of a Java$\backslash$nsystem to assess whether the choice of the design strategy moderates$\backslash$nthe effects of task order on effort and correctness. The results$\backslash$nshow that the time spent on making the changes is not affected significantly$\backslash$nby the task order of the maintenance tasks, regardless of the type$\backslash$nof design. However, the correctness of the maintainability tasks$\backslash$nis significantly higher when the task order of the change tasks is$\backslash$nEasy-First compared to Hard-First, again regardless of design. A$\backslash$npossible explanation for the results is that a steeper learning curve$\backslash$n(Hard-First) causes the programmer to create software that is less$\backslash$nmaintainable overall. {\textcopyright} 2008 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.},
author = {{Wang A.I.a Arisholm}, E.b c},
doi = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.infsof.2008.03.005},
issn = {0950-5849},
journal = {Information and Software Technology},
keywords = {Object-oriented design,cocome_lit-review},
mendeley-tags = {cocome_lit-review},
number = {2},
pages = {293--305},
title = {{The effect of task order on the maintainability of object-oriented software}},
url = {http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?eid=2-s2.0-56349133883{\&}partnerID=40{\&}md5=ac409ab1c2fa338f5e152afd0b1bf733},
volume = {51},
year = {2009}
}
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